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German studies leads Fulbrights, again

German studies Fulbright winners (from left): Matthew Thompson, Lindsay Jansen, Stephen Cottle, Jessica Wuebker, Patrick Carey, Christopher Noble, and Colin Donohoe. Not shown is Erina Megowan. The small department regularly yields more than its share of fellowship winners. Photo by Suzanne Camarata

German studies Fulbright winners (from left): Matthew Thompson, Lindsay Jansen, Stephen Cottle, Jessica Wuebker, Patrick Carey, Christopher Noble, and Colin Donohoe. Not shown is Erina Megowan. The small department regularly yields more than its share of fellowship winners. Photo by Suzanne Camarata

Fourteen Fulbright fellowships were awarded in 2005 to students and recent graduates of Boston College, and eight went to students with concentrations in German studies, a record for that department.

Sponsored by the State Department, the Fulbright fellowship supports a year of post-graduate study abroad. Last year Boston College tied for 16th among U.S. research universities, with 11 student fellowships; national data on the 2005 Fulbright awards is not yet available.

German majors and minors have won 41 Fulbrights in the past 10 years, about half of the University's total. The small department of three full-time and three part-time faculty and 40 student concentrators annually turns out as many Fulbrights as some universities, an accomplishment for which students credit Professor Michael Resler, chair of the department, who himself received a Fulbright in 1970 to study the poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke in Mainz, Germany. Fellowship winner Colin Donohoe '05 recalls that on his first visit to Resler's office as a freshman, "Here was this professor already telling me that I could win this scholarship."

According to Margaret Thomas, the University's Fulbright coordinator and an associate professor of Slavic and Eastern languages, the range of countries to which BC will send students next year has expanded as well. For the first time, India and Costa Rica have joined the list of hosting nations.

The Class of 2005 Fulbright winners and their projects:

Patrick Carey, a mathematics and philosophy major and German minor from New York City; the philosophy of mathematics, focusing on Georg Cantor's transfinite numbers and the work of Leopold Kronecker (University of Göttingen, Germany).

Stephen Cottle, an international studies and German major from Beverly, Massachusetts; the influence of the Green Party on German foreign policy (University of Trier, Germany).

Colin Donohoe, a biology major and German minor from Sterling, Massachusetts; cell migration in developing fruit flies (University of Tübingen, Germany).

Kristen Faucetta, a political science major and East European studies and history minor from Pompton Lakes, New Jersey; the fate of young adults raised in Bulgaria's orphanages (Sofia University, Bulgaria).

Lindsay Jansen, a political science major from Arden Hills, Minnesota; teaching English, with a business and entrepreneurial emphasis, at a high school in Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.

Erina Megowan, a history major from Corvallis, Oregon; research on the literature of dissent among the 1960s East German lyric poets Volker Braun, Sarah Kirsch, Reiner Kunze, and Wolf Biermann, and the novelist Ulrich Plenzdorf (University of Halle-Wittenberg, Germany).

Christopher Noble, a philosophy and German studies major from Slingerlands, New York; the 20th-century German philosopher Hans-Georg Gadamer (University of Freiburg, Germany).

Hannah Nolan-Spohn, an environmental geoscience major from Forest Park, Illinois; human demographic influences on cloud forest conservation (Monteverde, Costa Rica).

Michael Scahill, a biochemistry major from Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania; potential vaccine for malaria (International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, New Delhi, India).

Christy Slavik, a French major and history minor from Portland, Oregon; teaching English at L'Academie de Rouen, a secondary school in France.

Matthew Thompson, a sociology major and German and music minor from Menasha, Wisconsin; teaching English and American studies at the Albert-Einstein-Gymnasium, a secondary school in Maintal, Germany.

Jessica Wuebker, a German major from Gloucester City, New Jersey; comparison of exhibits during and after Communist rule (Dresden Historical Museum, Germany).

In addition, Ryan Murray '03, a psychology major and French minor from Huntington Beach, California, has been awarded a Fulbright to study the neurological and cognitive effects of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in relation to velocardiofacial syndrome at a psychiatric hospital in Geneva, Switzerland. And Scott Steinkerchner, OP, Ph.D.'05 (theology), will study Tibetan Buddhism in Nepal.

Mark Sullivan


Mark Sullivan is a senior staff writer for the BC Chronicle.

 


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