BC SealBoston College Magazine Spring 2005
In This Issue
Features
Prologue
Linden Lane
Works and Days
Postscript
Letters to the Editor
Special Section
BCM Home
Archives
Contact BCM
Coming Events
. Linden Lane
.

School choice

.

O'Keefe named Lynch School dean

O'Keefe: "Our relationship with students doesn't end with graduation." Photo by Gary Wayne Gilbert

O'Keefe: "Our relationship with students doesn't end with graduation." Photo by Gary Wayne Gilbert

Following a national search by a 12-member University committee representing professors, researchers, students, and senior administrators, Joseph M. O'Keefe, SJ, has been named the seventh dean of the University's Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School of Education. O'Keefe joined the Lynch School as an assistant professor in 1991, and has taught primarily in the Educational Administration Program. He was appointed associate dean in 2001, and has served as the school's interim dean for the past two years, since the departure of Mary Brabeck to head the Steinhardt School of Education at New York University.

"Fr. O'Keefe knows the Lynch School well from his years as a faculty member and administrator, and he is committed to its mission of teaching, research, and service," said University President William P. Leahy, SJ.

O'Keefe's academic research has focused primarily on the urban Catholic school, and he has coordinated the Lynch School's efforts to work with Catholic schools in the Boston area and nationwide. He is director of the National Center for Research in Catholic Education and is a codirector of SPICE (Selected Programs for Improving Catholic Education), a joint venture in research and information-sharing developed to assist Catholic schools by Boston College and the National Catholic Educational Association.

A native of Salem, Massachusetts, O'Keefe graduated in 1976 from the College of the Holy Cross, where he majored in philosophy. He joined the Society of Jesus in 1976, and taught at Bishop Connolly High School in Fall River, before earning his master's degree in French literature at Fordham University and a master's degree in educational administration at Harvard University. He taught for three years at Cheverus High School in Portland, Maine, and earned his doctorate in education from Harvard. He also holds a master of divinity degree and a licentiate in sacred theology from the Weston Jesuit School of Theology.

"I loved my teaching experience," he says, "but I was fascinated by how schools work. I was told by the Jesuits that I had an aptitude for administration, and initially the idea was that I would be a principal or work in secondary school administration." While pursuing graduate studies, he says, he became interested in university teaching and research. In addition to his work at Boston College, Fr. O'Keefe has served on the board of trustees at the College of the Holy Cross, John Carroll University, Le Moyne College, and Boston College High School.


"I HONESTLY believe the Lynch School is uniquely poised to lead the preparation of the next generation of teachers," said O'Keefe in an interview several weeks after he was named dean. Speaking by phone from a national meeting in Philadelphia, where he was scheduled to make a presentation on the state of Catholic schools, he said, "The reputation of our graduates, our experience in inner-city schools, our strong program in counseling, and our large research profile all make us an institution that people look to for leadership."

O'Keefe said that he wants alumni participation in building the school's future. "Our relationship with students doesn't end with graduation. We have an obligation from our side to offer them continuing support in their professional lives. And our success is going to take the help of our alumni, through financial support and by helping us to get our students and faculty into their school districts." O'Keefe said he hopes alumni will send their concerns and hopes for the school's future to his Boston College e-mail address.

Founded in 1952, the Lynch School has 60 full-time faculty and an enrollment of 786 undergraduate students and 1,055 graduate students. In 2005, the magazine US News & World Report ranked the school 16th among graduate research schools of education nationwide.

Reid Oslin


Reid Oslin is a staff writer for the Boston College Chronicle.

 

. . .
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
  » 
     
Alumni Home
BC Home